WHAT IS MATCHA?

Why our green goodness has caused so matcha excitement

WHAT IS MATCHA POWDER?

Despite its recent revival, matcha has been around for centuries as part of the traditional Japanese tea ceremony. Zen Buddhist monks have been reaping its many benefits for energy, concentration and wellness since long before the modern day “teatox”. Legendary Buddhist Monk, Eisai, hailed green tea as a precious medicine for health and long life. It sounds like a complicated “buzz word”, but matcha is surprisingly simple – it is pure green tea leaves stone ground into a fine powder.

WHAT IS MATCHA POWDER?

Despite its recent revival, matcha has been around for centuries as part of the traditional Japanese tea ceremony. Zen Buddhist monks have been reaping its many benefits for energy, concentration and wellness since long before the modern day “teatox”. Legendary Buddhist Monk, Eisai, hailed green tea as a precious medicine for health and long life. It sounds like a complicated “buzz word”, but matcha is surprisingly simple – it is pure green tea leaves stone ground into a fine powder.

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT TO REGULAR GREEN TEA?

With regular green tea, you brew the leaves in hot water and then throw them out afterwards. By contrast, matcha drinkers consume the whole leaf dissolved in the water along with all the green goodness they contain. Because of its concentrated form, matcha has up to 137 times the antioxidants and up to 10 times the nutritional content of regular green tea. Matcha tea leaves are also grown under special shades to increase the chlorophyll and antioxidant levels even further.

WHY IS IT GOOD FOR YOU?

IMMUNITY – According to the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) antioxidant measuring scale, matcha has a 1300 units per gram rating (vs pomegranates 105 units per gram or blueberries 91 units)! Antioxidants can help boost the immune system and fight free radicals in the body that can contribute to inflammation, tissue damaging and aging.

METABOLISM – Matcha contains a particular class of antioxidants called catechins, notably epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG, which is known to help enhance metabolism. Matcha can have up to 137 times the EGCGs that regular green tea contains!

ENERGY AND FOCUS – Matcha is also full of useful amino acids, particularly L-theanine that is unique to tea. This is the amino acid that stimulates alpha wave production in the brain to create relaxation and concentration at the same time, providing alertness without the shakes and jitters of coffee. It helps provide a sustained energy release over hours, hence matcha’s meditative origins.

FREE FROM – Matcha is naturally sugar free, dairy free, almost calorie free and naturally vegan friendly. Everyone’s best friend!

VITAMINS & MINERALS – Here is where we could get super technical with bioflavonoids and other confusing words. To simplify, lots of other goodies in green tea (and therefore matcha) can help detoxify and enhance wellbeing. For example, the special way it is grown in the shade helps increase the chlorophyll in the leaves, which is known to be a natural detoxifying agent.

HOW DO I USE IT?

As matcha is highly concentrated, a little goes a long way. It can seem costly compared to regular green tea, but its benefits reflect its price tag. Our suggested serving size is ½ to 1 teaspoon (2g). We have a special matcha spoon HERE if you need.

The traditional ceremonial preparation requires a whisk and a time-consuming process. Our matcha has been carefully selected to be more accessible and convenient, so you can use a whisk if desired or simply dissolve in a dash of WARM water to form a paste and then add boiling water (for a plain tea), warm milk (for a latte) or mix it in with other ingredients depending on the recipe (see here for some of our favourites).

BUY ORGANIC MATCHA POWDER ONLINE

Check out the new Matcha Maiden range

SCIENTIFIC REFERENCES
Lipophilic and Hydrophilic Antioxidant Capacities of Common Foods in the United States, Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry 2004, 52, 4026-4037 // ORAC Analysis on Matcha Green Tea: Brunswick Laboratories Cardoso, G., Salgado, J., Cesar, M. and Donado-Pestana, C. (2013). The effects of green tea consumption and resistance training on body composition and resting metabolic rate in overweight or obese women. Journal of medicinal food, 16(2), pp.120–127. Weiss, David J.; Anderton, Christopher R. (2003). “Determination of catechins in matcha green tea by micellar electrokinetic chromatography”. Journal of Chromatography A 1011 (1–2): 173–80 Mukhtar H1, Ahmad N (1999). Green tea in chemoprevention of cancer. Toxicology Sciences 52:111 Suganuma M, Okabe S, Sueoka N, Sueoka E, Matsuyama S, Imai K, Nakachi K, Fujiki H (1999). Green tea and cancer chemoprevention. Mutation Research 428(1-2):339-44. Juneja, L (1999). “L-theanine—a unique amino acid of green tea and its relaxation effect in humans”. Trends in Food Science & Technology 10 (6–7): 199. Yang GY, Liao J, Kim K, Yurkow EJ, Yang CS. (1998). Inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cell lines by tea polyphenols. Carcinogesis 19(4):611-6. Yang F, de Villiers WJ, McClain CJ, Varilek GW. (1998). Green tea polyphenols block endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor-production and lethality in a murine model. Journal of Nutrition 128(12):2334-40